Coronavirus - Your role in protecting Hull

Keeping Hull safe campaign image

Coronavirus - Tier three restrictions in place

Following the ending of national coronavirus restrictions on 2 December, the tier system has been reinstated.

Hull is now in Tier three, Very High Alert – the strongest level of restriction. It is vital everyone understands and follows the rules around what we can and cannot do.

There are some rules which are tier-specific and some general ones. Everyone must follow both the tier-specific rules and the general ones, which apply to all areas, regardless of tier.

You may be aware the government has also introduced separate guidance relating specifically to the Christmas period. Everyone will be allowed to form social bubbles for a short period of time, regardless of tier.

Additional details on the guidance for the Christmas period.

If you are experiencing financial or other difficulties due to Coronavirus, you may be eligible for support.

Additional information on community support.

Across all tiers, everyone -

  • must wear a face covering in all places they are required, including most indoor public settings, unless they have an exemption
  • should follow the rules on meeting others safely
  • should attend school or college as normal, unless they are self-isolating as the following remain open in all tiers -
    • schools
    • universities
    • colleges
    • early years settings
  • should walk or cycle where possible, plan ahead and avoid busy times and routes when travelling
  • must follow the gathering limits at their tier except for in specific settings and circumstances. These exemptions are detailed at the end of this guidance

Tier three restrictions (Very High)

  • you must not meet socially indoors or in most outdoor places with anybody you do not live with, or who is not in your support bubble, this includes in any private garden or at most outdoor venues.
  • you must not socialise in a group of more than six in some other outdoor public spaces, including parks, beaches, countryside accessible to the public, a public garden, grounds of a heritage site or castle, or a sports facility – this is called the ‘rule of six’
  • hospitality settings, such as the below are closed - they are permitted to continue sales by takeaway, click-and-collect, drive-through or delivery services.
    • bars (including shisha venues)
    • pubs
    • cafes
    • restaurants are closed
  • accommodation such as the below must close, although there are several exemptions, such as for those who use these venues as their main residence, and those requiring the venues where it is reasonably necessary for work or education and training  -
    • hotels
    • B&Bs
    • campsites
    • guest houses.
  • indoor entertainment and tourist venues must close. This includes -
    • indoor play centres and areas, including trampolining parks and soft play
    • casinos
    • bingo halls
    • bowling alleys
    • skating rinks
    • amusement arcades and adult gaming centres
    • laser quests and escape rooms
    • cinemas
    • theatres
    • concert halls
    • snooker halls
  • indoor attractions at mostly outdoor entertainment venues must also close (indoor shops, through-ways and public toilets at such attractions can remain open). This includes indoor attractions within - 
    • zoos
    • safari parks
    • wildlife reserves
    • aquariums
    • visitor attractions at farms, and other animal attractions
    • model villages
    • museums
    • galleries
    • sculpture parks
    • botanical gardens
    • biomes
    • greenhouses
    • theme parks
    • circuses
    • fairgrounds and funfairs
    • visitor attractions at -
      • film studios
      • heritage sites such as castles and stately homes
    • landmarks including observation decks and viewing platforms
  • leisure and sports facilities may continue to stay open, but group exercise classes (including fitness and dance) should not go ahead.
  • there should be no public attendance at spectator sport or indoor performances and large business events should not be taking place. Elite sport events may continue to take place without spectators
  • large outdoor events (performances and shows) should not take place, with the exception of drive-in events
  • places of worship remain open, but you must not attend with or socialise with  anyone outside of your household or support bubble while you are there, unless a legal exemption applies
  • weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on the number of attendees – 15 people can attend wedding ceremonies, wedding receptions are not allowed, 30 people can attend funeral ceremonies, 15 people can attend linked commemorative events
  • organised outdoor sport, and physical activity and exercise classes can continue, however higher-risk contact activity should not take place
  • organised indoor sport, physical activity and exercise classes cannot take place indoors. There are exceptions for indoor disability sport, sport for educational purposes and supervised sport and physical activity for under-18s
  • you can continue to travel to venues or amenities which are open, but should aim to reduce the number of journeys you make where possible
  • avoid travelling outside of your area, including for overnight stays other than where necessary (You can travel through other areas as part of a longer journey), such as -
    • work
    • education
    • youth services
    • to receive medical treatment
    • caring responsibilities
  • for international travel see the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office travel advice for your destination and the travel corridors lists via the links below -

Access travel advice

Access the travel corridors list

Find out more about the measures that apply in Tier three areas

Tier two restrictions (High) -

  • you must not socialise with anyone you do not live with or who is not in your support bubble in any indoor setting, whether at home or in a public place
  • you must not socialise in a group of more than six people outside, including in a garden or a public space – this is called the ‘rule of six’
  • businesses and venues can continue to operate, in a COVID-Secure manner, other than those which remain closed by law, such as nightclubs
  • pubs and bars must close, unless operating as restaurants. Hospitality venues can only serve alcohol with substantial meals
  • hospitality businesses selling food or drink for consumption on their premises are required to:
  • provide table service only, in premises which sell alcohol
  • close between 11pm and 5am (hospitality venues in airports, ports, transport services and motorway service areas are exempt)
  • stop taking orders after 10pm
  • hospitality businesses and venues selling food and drink for consumption off the premises can continue to do so after 10pm as long as this is through delivery service, click-and-collect or drive-through
  • early closure (11pm) applies to (Cinemas, theatres and concert halls can stay open beyond 11pm in order to conclude performances  that start before 10pm) -
    • casinos
    • cinemas
    • theatres
    • museums
    • bowling alleys
    • amusement arcades
    • funfairs
    • theme parks
    • adventure parks and activities
    • bingo halls
  • public attendance at outdoor and indoor events (performances and shows) is permitted, limited to whichever is lower: 50% capacity, or either 2,000 people outdoors or 1,000 people indoors
  • public attendance at spectator sport and business events can resume inside and outside, subject to social contact rules and limited to whichever is lower: 50% capacity, or either 2,000 people outdoors or 1,000 people indoors
  • places of worship remain open but you must not socialise with people from outside of your household or support bubble while you are indoors there, unless a legal exemption applies
  • weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on numbers of attendees – 15 people can attend wedding ceremonies and receptions, 30 people can attend funeral ceremonies, and 15 people can attend linked commemorative events such as wakes  or stonesettings.
  • organised outdoor sport, and physical activity and exercise classes can continue
  • organised indoor sport, physical activity and exercise classes will only be permitted if it is possible for people to avoid mixing with people they do not live with (or share a support bubble with). There are exceptions for indoor disability sport, sport for educational purposes and supervised sport and physical activity for under-18s, which can take place with larger groups mixing
  • you can continue to travel to venues or amenities which are open, but should aim to reduce the number of journeys you make where possible
  • if you live in a tier two area, you must continue to follow tier two rules when you travel to a tier one area. Avoid travel to or overnight stays in tier three areas other than where necessary, such as for work, education, youth services, to receive medical treatment, or because of caring responsibilities. You can travel through a tier three area as a part of a longer journey
  • for international travel see the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office travel advice for your destination and the travel corridors list

Find out more about the measures that apply in Tier two areas

Tier one restrictions (Medium) -

In Tier one:

  • you must not socialise in groups larger than six people, indoors or outdoors, other than where a legal exemption applies.  This is called the ‘rule of six’
  • businesses and venues can remain open, in a COVID secure manner, other than those which remain closed by law, such as nightclubs
  • hospitality businesses selling food or drink for consumption on their premises are required to:
  • provide table service only, for premises that serve alcohol
  • close between 11pm and 5am (hospitality venues in airports, ports, on transport services and in motorway service areas are exempt)
  • stop taking orders after 10pm
  • hospitality businesses and venues selling food and drink for consumption off the premises can continue to do so after 10pm as long as this is through delivery service, click-and-collect or drive-through
  • early closure (11pm) applies to (Cinemas, theatres and concert halls can stay open beyond 11pm in order to conclude performances that start before 10pm) -
    • casinos
    • cinemas
    • theatres
    • concert halls
    • museums
    • bowling alleys
    • amusement arcades
    • funfairs
    • theme parks
    • adventure parks and activities
    • bingo halls
  • public attendance at outdoor and indoor events (performances and shows) is permitted, limited to whichever is lower: 50% capacity, or either 4,000 people outdoors or 1,000 people indoors
  • public attendance at spectator sport and business events can resume inside and outside, subject to social contact rules and limited to whichever is lower: 50% capacity, or either 4,000 people outdoors or 1,000 people indoors
  • places of worship remain open, but you must not attend or socialise in groups of more than 6 people while there, unless a legal exemption applies
  • weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on numbers of attendees – 15 people can attend wedding ceremonies and receptions, 30 people can attend funeral ceremonies, and 15 people can attend linked commemorative events
  • organised outdoor sport, physical activity and exercise classes can continue
  • organised indoor sport, physical activity and exercise classes can continue to take place, if the rule of six is followed. There are exceptions for indoor disability sport, sport for educational purposes, and supervised sport and physical activity for under-18s, which can take place with larger groups mixing
  • if you live in a tier one area and travel to an area in a higher tier you should follow the rules for that area while you are there. Avoid travel to or overnight stays in tier three areas other than where necessary, such as for work, education, youth services, to receive medical treatment, or because of caring responsibilities. You can travel through a tier three area as part of a longer journey
  • for international travel see the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office travel advice for your destination and the travel corridors list

Find out more about the measures that apply in Tier one areas.

Councillor Stephen Brady OBE, has written to all residents in Hull about the current health emergency facing the city.

The correspondence comes on the back of confirmation last week that Hull had recorded the highest infection rate in the country. Councillor Brady OBE asks everyone to do their utmost to follow health guidelines, to stop the spread, and help others.

Find below a copy of the letter in multiple languages -

Information on the support available including for those classed as Clinically Extremely Vulnerable and shielding can be found using the link below.

Find out about community support available for coronavirus

Making a difference

Its is vital for everyone to keep themselves informed of which Local Alert Level Hull is in and what restrictions apply.

We also need to do three things -

  • take care by - 
    • following the appropriate rules for your area and following the latest social distance guidance including 
    • washing your hands regularly and thoroughly, with soap, for at least 20 seconds
    • wearing a face covering when necessary

Find out about the latest social distancing guidance

  • take notice by recognising Coronavirus symptoms and the fact these could change. Currently, symptoms are a- 
    • high temperature
    • new continuous cough
    • loss or change of sense of smell or taste

Find out what the symptoms of Coronavirus are

  • Take action by staying at home if you or anyone in your household has symptoms, if you find you have had contact with someone with Coronavirus symptoms, or if you are asked to. Anyone with symptoms must get a test as soon as possible.

Read the stay at home guidance

What this means for Hull

Access the below document for further information on what the high level alert means for Hull.

Report concerns about a local business

Anyone can report concerns about potential breaches by businesses of the closure restrictions and social distancing during the pandemic or get advice on these matters.

Please provide details using the form below -

The Coronavirus Outbreak Prevention and Management Plan

This plan guides our work to prevent and contain outbreaks, it was approved by our Cabinet on Monday 27 July 2020.

The plan, developed by us and our local partners in the city, describes how Coronavirus will be controlled at a local level in Hull. It defines our role and how it will work with partners across the city to reduce risks of virus transmission, prevent outbreaks and deal with them when they occur.

The plan, which can be accessed above, was developed in response to the government transferring local responsibility for Coronavirus to councils and their partners. It explains who will lead the work and the organisations involved; places, people and situations which may be at greater risk; and what will happen when Hull has cases or outbreaks.

An elected-member led Hull Outbreak Control Engagement Board has been established, which will focus on engaging with local communities and partners.

A key element of prevention and management will be the NHS Test and Trace programme, a government initiative intended to control and contain the spread of the virus by identifying people at high risk of having been exposed and ensuring they isolate. Our local knowledge and expertise will be key in making sure everyone, particularly those who are vulnerable or marginalised, understands what they must do and is able to do it.

The responsibility of both ourselves and our partners involve overseeing the -

  • contact tracing workforce
  • managing complex cases and outbreaks
  • utilising health protection and epidemiological staff
  • supporting contact tracing and self-isolation for people who are homeless/rough sleepers or vulnerable

It will be involved where there are outbreaks within a particular setting (a school, care setting or other location).

Test and Trace

Test and Trace is intended to control and contain the spread of Coronavirus. It does this by identifying people at high risk of having been exposed to the virus and ensuring those people isolate to avoid spreading it further.

Anyone with Coronavirus symptoms of any age can and should now be tested. When someone tests positive they will be contacted and asked to isolate and to provide details of every person they have had close contact with during the time they have been infectious. This time period and how a ‘close contact’ is defined will be explained. Those contacts will also then get a text, email or phone call explaining that they are at risk of Coronavirus and must also isolate.

The track and trace app is now available to download

Your role

Every person in Hull simply needs to be ready to isolate if asked. Any plans to control the virus and keep people in the city safe only work if everyone does their part. This means continuing to follow government advice around Coronavirus, getting a test if you have symptoms, and isolating when asked. 

Government advice on Coronavirus

Coronavirus testing

Anyone who has Coronavirus symptoms can now be tested, including people aged under five. The antigen (swab) test confirms whether someone has Coronavirus. There is also an antibody blood test (which can tell if someone has had the virus and recovered) now in the process of being rolled-out, though this is not part of the NHS Test and Trace programme. 

Book an NHS Coronavirus test

Book an NHS Coronavirus test for key workers

The isolation period

The isolation period is 14 days from the most recent point of contact with the person infected with Coronavirus. What is classed as contact will be explained in any communication you receive should you be asked to isolate.

The latest advice from the World Health Organisation (WHO) is that there is no evidence to suggest having Coronavirus and recovering provides immunity, therefore you can be asked to isolate more than once.

Test and Trace Scam

There have been national reports of a Test and Trace scam, which asks for money. Genuine calls will never ask you for money, bank details or to download anything.

More information on how to know communication is genuine

Further information

General advice on Coronavirus

More on Test and Trace

Advice for employees

Advice for employers